Probate Compulsory for a Will to bequeath property in Mumbai
Source: Livemint.com

The Private Client team at Cyril Amarchand Mangaldas shares their comments and opinions in an article in the  following Q&A which was published by the Mint Newspaper on 18th August, 2021 and the online edition of the same can be found here.

I reside in Mumbai with my family in a flat transferred to me as per the Will of my father after his death. Now, I wish to sell this flat. I have two siblings, one in Mumbai and another in Chennai. For selling the flat, is it necessary to get their approval? Do they have to sign the sale deed, as the Will is not probated? My brother in Chennai is unable to move out of his house due to ill health. Is it necessary to get a power of attorney (PoA) from him to sell the flat? If yes, how can it be done? Is it necessary that I must also be present to sign in the PoA? Also, considering the health of my brother, is there a provision to call the registrar home and certify the PoA deed? Please advise.

—Mallika G.


Continue Reading Probate Compulsory for a Will to bequeath property in Mumbai

Siblings get estate in intestacy if parents pre-decease owner
Source: Livemint.com

The Private Client team at Cyril Amarchand Mangaldas shares their comments and opinions in an article in the  following Q&A which was published by the Mint Newspaper on 04th August, 2021 and the online edition of the same can be found here.

My elder brother and his wife died recently. They don’t have any children and have not left behind a Will. We were three brothers of whom now I am the sole survivor. We also have two sisters who are married. Now, who will be the successor to my late brother’s property, including movable and immovable assets?

—Name withheld on request


Continue Reading Siblings get estate in intestacy if parents pre-decease owner

The rights of a legal heir supersede the rights of a nominee
Source: Livemint.com

The Private Client team at Cyril Amarchand Mangaldas shares their comments and opinions in an article in the  following Q&A which was published by the Mint Newspaper on 07th July, 2021 and the online edition of the same can be found here.

My father and mother passed away after they came down with covid. My father had made a registered Will in 2015. According to that document, my nephew has been named the claimant of all his liquid assets. However, after 2015, my father declared me as his nominee in almost all his bank accounts. Under these circumstances, who is the rightful claimant of my father’s liquid assets, my nephew or myself?

—Name withheld on request


Continue Reading The rights of a legal heir supersede the rights of a nominee

In some Indian states, stamp duty is not payable on a document through which a property has been transferred in favour of a blood relative. (Photo: iStock) – Source: Livemint

The Private Client team at Cyril Amarchand Mangaldas shares their comments and opinions shared in an article in the  following Q&A which was published by the Mint Newspaper on 3rd and the online edition of the same can be found at: https://www.livemint.com/money/personal-finance/gifts-deeds-are-not-reversible-so-the-giver-can-t-get-back-the-rights-11583220828729.html

My mother and I co-own a residential property in Mumbai. She has decided to transfer her share of the property to my name. Should we prepare a gift deed or a relinquishment or release deed to execute this transfer? The property has been mortgaged to a bank, but I have obtained a no-objection certificate (NOC) for the transfer. Will I also have to ask the housing society in which the property is located to transfer the share certificate to my name? Can I include a clause in the deed to ensure that if I am survived by my mother, the rights will be transferred back to her upon my death?

—Chirag


Continue Reading Gifts deeds are not reversible, so the giver can’t get back the rights

Will and testament
The Indian Succession Act does not make it compulsory to appoint an executor of a Will, (iStock)

The Private Client team at Cyril Amarchand Mangaldas shares their comments and opinions shared in an article in the  following Q&A which was published by the Mint Newspaper on and the online edition of the same can be found at: https://www.livemint.com/insurance/news/it-is-not-necessary-to-appoint-a-lawyer-as-executor-of-your-will-11580203086115.html

My life insurance policies have nominees. But I want the life insurance proceeds to go to a few other people, too. I wish to specify the same in the Will. Can it get challenged as the nominee names are different?

A Will is one of the most frequently used tools in the process of succession planning. A Will is made by testators at the appropriate stage(s) of their life, and usually benefits family. However, a fear that looms large in their mind is the risk that someone may challenge the Will, causing it to get stuck in the labyrinth of the Indian court system. This fear is likely to be more acute when the testator knows that there is a specific person, either within the family or outside, who may challenge the bequests (or lack thereof!) under the Will. Unfortunately, there are many instances of such messy and protracted disputes. The main victims who suffer in these disputes are the testator’s family – they will not inherit the estate until the dispute is settled. Hence, the testator’s fears are completely justified.

To avoid these consequences, one option the testator can explore is entering into a contractual waiver with such persons – whereby any one or all of the beneficiaries (those who may benefit under the testator’s will, family or non-family) forego their right to challenge the Will. This would mean that the family can inherit the estate smoothly and quickly, without dispute or hassle.

But why would a beneficiary agree to do so? It ultimately comes down to a commercial decision and negotiation. Beneficiaries will be concerned that certain assets or amounts from the estate should come to them (for reasons which may not always be robust, or which may withstand a deeper legal scrutiny). If the testator can agree to meet such requests through the Will, or even by way of a lifetime transfer, then the beneficiaries may be willing to enter into a contractual waiver of their right to challenge it. But this is a commercial decision that needs to be taken by both parties. Testators are ultimately buying peace for their family after death. This article further explores the legality and practical aspects of such a waiver.


Continue Reading Can You Waive Your Right to Challenge a Will?